Work / InfoEvita Yumul



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CV, Works Cited, Links, Evita Yumul

   
2014
200_-
Booklets, Publications
The Sorrows, 2014
The Sorrows of Young Werther re-read and used as a delayed response and "unexpected disclosure at just the wrong time" to a two year old email from D.R.
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grey

B/w digital print, staple bound, 60pg, bookmark, grey or yellow or blue cover, 30 copies 3.8 x 6 in
Photographs I Took (from Facebook) V, 2014
This is temporary. I'll be back.
Other.


4, 3, etc.
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B/w laser, staple bound, 24pg, 30 copies 3.5 x 7 in
Older (scroll down or use Search):

Timecard, 2013
A card for NSEW Press' Winter Postcards series.
Thank you Jessica Williams.

Blue risograph printed postcards, 4 x 5.5 in.

 
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Broadsides, 2013
A consideration for petrellasimports.net.
Thank you: Anne, Elise, and Sophie. 7 ref.

9 pages/ideally 7 A3 sheets folded in eighths, unlimited copies, 105MB. Download / Mirror (soon).
 
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A Lover's Dog-ears, 2013
Pages dog-eared by the previous owner of my copy of Barthes' A Lover's Discourse. Notations and marks on the pages have been used to translate the attentions of the former reader as both divergent account and exacting affinity.

Color laser and risograph print, staple bound, 56pg, 2pg insert, bookmark, 25 copies, 5.5 x 8.25 in.

 
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Bulletin I, 2 Supplement., 2013
Fra Angelico's The Mocking of Christ (c.1440-1441) pared down in response to Ai Oe' s[Bulletin I,2.] layout / A hint for reading the work of Fra Angelico. Published by Booklet.

Color digital, 1pg folded, many copies, 7 x 8.6in.


 
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Art Anagrams: Dead Giveaway, 2013
IV: On having witnessed a young-all-over-the-Internet artist discredit another young artist on-line for an attitude mirrored in the contents of this publication / On tempering a response to the first artist's penchant for laying claim. Referent terms absent. See AAs 1-3.

Risograph print on cardstock and 128gsm stock, staple bound, 8pg & card, 20 copies, 5 x 7in.
 
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An interview he did not publish, 2013
Risograph print, staple bound, 12pg, 30 copies, 5 x 7in.
 
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Photographs I Took (from Facebook (Strictly Apologetic)), 2013
Third and last (???) in the Facebook series. See 1 & 2. Risograph print, staple bound, 20pg, 30 copies. 5x7in.
 
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People, 2013
~After Ed Ruscha. Risograph print, 10.5x15.5in folded.
 
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Reader's Block, 2012
Published by Reading Material. B/w, perfect bound, 190pg [67,721 words], open edition. 5 x 7in.
   
     
Tragic Cats, 2012
Published by Booklet. B/w digital, accordion fold, 7pg, open edition.
 
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Sore Loss, Big _ Deal, Various Authors, 2012
Or A Quick Look at Friend Art in Japan, part 0. Color laser on cyclus, staple bound, 16pg, 10 copies, 5x7in. 
 
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Photographs I Took (from Facebook) 日本語, 2012
On Tokyo. If you're too sensitive, oh well. Thanks to Shoko Okabe for the cover. Color laser, staple bound, 20pg, 25 copies, 5x7in.
 
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Photographs I Took (from Facebook), 2011
3 print runs; color laser on recycled paper or cyclus, 24pg, 25 copies/run, 5x7in. 
 
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Close Cropped Ikebana, 2012
Google sourced. For several fellow foreigners and on time in Japan. Color digital on cyclus, staple bound, 32pg, 5x7.5in.
 
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250 Words or Less, 2010-11
125 reviews of almost all the art or art-related shows seen (in Tokyo) over the last year and a half, in 250 words or less. All but the two sentence entry equating the work of -. at (gallery name) to a friend's collection of toenail clippings that he made while he was in Italy are stated in serious, non-casual language and were productive considerations at the time. On monoculture.

Each entry in English and Japanese (translated by Yu Morishita). B/w laser on newsprint, staple bound, 128 pg, 5x7in.
 
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104 words in the private history of a love that failed, 2011
A paracollaboration with Maybe S. Crazier unanagrammed. Published by Booklet. B/w photocopy, 1/50 colored paper covers, 1/104 individual notes, envelope, transparent elastic cord, mixed-to-match-the-cover Holbein pastel pile in plastic bag, 110 pages, edition of 104, 6x8in.
 
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Art Anagrams, 2011-
     General Terms - Aesthetics, annoyances, appropriation, artist, Baldessari, Beuys, circumstance, communication, depiction, discourse, distance, drawing; Duchamp, Marcel; ephemeral, estrangement, feeling, friend art, gratuitous, Guston, history, ideas, intangible, legibility, listening, material, metaphor, metastasis, narcissistic, narrative, nature, negation, paradigm, perception, placeholder, practice, privacy, problematic, process, publicity, reasoning, referential, render, representation, residual, response, retinal; Ruscha, Edward; sentiments, shadows, site-specific, society, strategy, Sturtevant, trace, underscore, variables and viewer. 36pg, 25 copies, 5x7in.
     On Ed Ruscha - 152 Ruscha titles anagrammed (in select cases, several times). Click here to see the full list of titles in this booklet. Cover is the average color of the paintings from the year that produced the most anagrams (1989; R105/G106/B116). 72pg, 25 copies , 5x7in.
     On Laurie Anderson - 80 Laurie Anderson titles anagrammed (in select cases, several times) arranged by album. Click here to see the full list of titles in this booklet. Cover is Bright Red, as in Anderson's 1994 album title. Full text (audio). 36pg, 25 copies, 5x7in.
 
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Even older, maybe never.    

Various Various
 
2014 New from Template... An image made in April for _ that will sit until the summer months.
Try


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2013 Untitled (paint on wall)

The average color of the paint on wall of every blue-backed internet-found image of Felix Gonzalez Torres' Untitled (Perfect Lovers) as of November 13, 2013.

R189 G206 B219
C32 M17 Y11 K0
HTML #bdcedb

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blue

Jpegs

Or wall paint, or paint on wall
Variable
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2013 Red dot

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red

Rubies in 925 silver tack settings 6mm gem, .5 in length
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2013 Timestamp
Or Untitled (11217)
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black


7USD, Tracking "3/4 x 1 in" 
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2013-, 2011- uUntitled Various (3) _-_ _.





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Various Various
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2013 FGT ABT&GSG, 1992 Or Untitled (Grave), ref. Gonzalez-Torres
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Digital print on cotton shirt, embroidered hang tag US Mens XS
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2013- Listening Material






Live feed; attentions vary. Thursdays 9:30- amUTC+9 / convert


Resumes 2014.


7 November
- Mark Wigley, "The Architecture of Atmosphere," Daidalos 68 (1998): 18-27. 16:06.
31 October - Mark Wigley, “Unleashing the Archive,” Future Anterior, Vol. 2, No. 2 (Winter 2005): 11-14.
Jean-Luc Nancy, "The Insufficiency of 'Values' and the Necessity of 'Sense'," trans. Steve Bastow, Journal for Cultural Research Vol. 9, No. 4 (October 2005): 437-441. 22:13.
24 October - Athena Tacha, Different Notions of Time (Washington, DC: A Tacha, 2005). 11:54.
17 October - Rosalind Krauss, "Antivision," October 36 (Spring 1986): 147-154. 17:02.
10 October - Georges Bataille, "Sacrifices," in Visions of Excess: Selected Writings, 1927-1939, ed. Allan Stoekl (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1985), 130-136.
Maurice Blanchot, "Friendship," in Friendship (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1997), 282-289. 27:33.
26 September, 3 October - Cancelled. LM resumes 10 October.
19 September - Julio Cortázar and Jason Weiss, "Julio Cortázar, The Art of Fiction No. 83," Paris Review 93 (Fall 1984). 26:11.
5, 12 September - Cancelled. LM resumes 19 September.
29 August - Maurice Blanchot, "The Madness of the Day" in The Station Hill Blanchot Reader, trans. Lydia Davis (Barrytown, NY: Station Hill Press, 1999), 191-199. 21:34.
22 August - Cancelled.
15 August - Jonathan Safran Foer, "How Not to Be Alone," New York Times, June 8, 2013. 7:39.
8 August - Winy Maas, "Winy Mass: Interview," Perspecta 35 (2004): 54-61. 25:38.
1 August - K. Michael Hayes, "Prolegomenon for a Study Linking the Advanced Architecture of the Present to That of the 1970s through Ideologies of Media, the Experience of Cities in Transition, and the Ongoing Effects of Reification," Perspecta 32 (2001): 100-107. 35:30.
25 July - Miwon Kwon, "The Becoming of a Work of Art: FGT and a Possibility of Renewal, a Chance to Share, A Fragile Truce," in Felix Gonzalez-Torres, ed. Julie Ault (Gottingen and New York: Steidl and the Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation, 2006), 303-309.
Lina Bo Bardi, "Culture and Non-Culture," in Stones Against Diamonds (London: AA Publications, 2012), 54-56. 21:38.
18 July - Miwon Kwon, "Exchange Rate: On Obligation and Reciprocity in Some Art of the 1960s and After," in Work Ethic, ed. Helen Molesworth (University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2003), 83-96. 25:00.
27 June, 4 & 11 July - Cancelled. LM will resume on 18 July.
20 June - Jeffrey Kipnis, "Drawing A Conclusion," Perspecta 22 (1986): 94-99.
Jorge Luis Borges, "Delia Elena San Marco," in Dreamtigers, trans. Mildred Boyer (Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2004), 32. 14:53.
18 June - Jenny Holzer and Edward Lewine, "At Home with Jenny Holzer, The Artist," New York Times, December 20, 2009.
Ed Ruscha and Deborah Solomon, "The Picture of an All-American," New York Times, June 12, 2005. 12:12.
13 June - Cancelled. Rescheduled to Tuesday, 18 June.
6 June - Jean Baudrillard, "Concerning the Fulfillment of Desire in Exchange Value," in For a Critique of the Political Economy of the Sign (St. Louis, MO: Telos Press Publishing, 1981), 204-212.
John Hejduk, "The Space In-Between," Perspecta 22 (1986): 88-93. 26:35.
30 May - Hal Foster, "The Passion of the Sign," in The Return of the Real (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1996), 71-80.
Roland Barthes, "Change the Object Itself," in Image-music-text (New York: Fontana Press, 1993), 165-169. 31:45.
23 May - Georges Bataille, "Friendship," Parallax 7, No. 1 (2001): 6-15. 31:03.
16 May - Chantal Mouffe, "Citizenship and Politcal Identity," October 61 (Summer 1992): 28-32.
Hal Foster et al., "Questionnaire on 'The Contemporary'" October 130 (Fall 2009): 3.
Miwon Kwon, "Response to Questionnaire on 'The Contemporary'" October 130 (Fall 2009): 13-15. 23:28.
9 May - Roland Barthes and Katrine Pilcher Keuneman, Criticism and Truth (classic Criticism), New ed. (London: Continuum, 2007), 23-40. 26:54.
2 May - Moved to 30 April
30 April - Ernesto Laclau, "How politics constructs social links," L'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui 382 (2011): 95-101. 21:05.
25 April - Felix Gonzalez-Torres, A Selection of Snapshots Taken by Felix Gonzalez-Torres (New York City: ART Press, 2010), pages with handwritten text.
John Hejduk, "Diary Constructions," Perspecta 23 (1987): 78-91. 22:10.
18 April - Joseph Kosuth / Arthur R. Rose, "Four Interviews," Arts Magazine (February 1969): 23.
Joseph Kosuth and Stuart Morgan, "Art as Idea as Idea: An interview with Joseph Kosuth," Frieze Magazine 16 (May 1994), http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/art_as_idea_as_idea/ (accessed January 4, 2009). 28:01.
11 April - John Hejduk, Lancaster Hanover Masque (London: Princeton Architectural Press, 1992). 30:00.
4 April - Roland Barthes and Saul Steinberg, All Except You (Paris: Maeght, 1983). Excerpts read in French, 30:00.

  Live feed 3~20:00-45:00 each
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2013
STURTEVANT IN PARIS [BY FRIEZE]





A transcript of "In Paris with Sturtevant", on Frieze Video from March 21, 2013. Corrections welcome. See also.


Sturtevant: I, of course, am Sturtevant, and I'd like you to meet my co-producer Loren Muzzey, who is co-prodcer of Ça va aller Productions here in Paris, and also my general manager of the studio, Guillaume, two very crucial people to the work. This is of course my wonderful small studio, which is okay because all I do now is video, I don't do painting.

Cybernetics, of course, is part of our digital world and the digital world is subservient to cybernetics. And, it's very powerful force now. For instance, I explain our current digital world as excess, limitation, transgression, and fatigue. One of the powerful movements of the cybernetic world is the reversal of hierarchies, so that, like, information is above knowledge, where it used to be knowledge was a higher power than information. Now it's quite the opposite. Once you get to object over object, the object in itself becomes its own representation, which becomes very interesting. Image over image is of course what we're really in now, and this is all based on the work of that dirty little trickster called simulacra, which I've been tracing for a long time.

Simulacra is becoming minor in terms of its force—incredible—has changed truth into falsity, and so it's very, it's big, big phenomena. What has to be realized here is that a great deal of a—due to cybernetics is many people have a vast, barren interior, which means that you have no mind, you have no mind working and pretty soon, you have no unique experiences, your experience will be everybody else's experience, and if you talk to any of these powerful Internet guys, you know what they want to do? They want to animate all inanimate objects, that's their new goal.

When I first started to work, I was basically interested in just the a, basic ground of repetition. You know, how repetition worked and how it functioned. So repetition is not repeating. Repetition is like interior movement, it's also difference, and it's also pushing the limitations of resemblance. Really basically comes out of Deleuze.

Deleuze, for me, is playful, so that, you know, it's like, yes, you go along with it and then you skip big areas because it's just too much, you know, and then Foucault triggers the mind so that you read him and, Bing!, your mind starts going tkutchu-tchu--tchu-tchu-tschu-tsh. You know I'm working on an opera on Spinoza. The problem with doing an opera on Spinoza is that there are no female, male conflicts, and that's what most operas are based on. So, the problem was, what would you make the object of conflict in it, of course, I decided then, of course it would be thinking—the object of this thinking basically is God. I have devised a crowd as a totality, so that they have one voice, then on the other side of the stage I have a chorus which represents our digital age and so then that starts making a great conflict and great resolution. I think it's an opera no one would want to go to [laughs]. But that's okay. God is a pretty current subject, isn't it?
  Video (reference) 531 words
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2013
Aug 5
STURTEVANT: LEAPS JUMPS AND BUMPS





A transcript of a video on Elaine Sturtevant on Nowness from August 1st, 2013. Corrections welcome. See also.


Sturtevant: The Abstract Expressionists were really very highly thought of and then Pop Art came in. So, one was all emotion and Pop Art was all mass culture. It made you think about what is the power of art. So you start thinking about the understructure of art. Where does that force come from?

It was totally quiet when I started. Nobody knew who I was or what I was doing--it was so great [laughs]. Years later, the Appropriationists came in and they were very important for me because then I could give negative definition in my work. Before that, nobody knew what I was doing. The Appropriationists were really about the loss of originality and I was about the power of thought. Very big difference.

No matter how I articulated what I was doing--didn't make any difference--they called it copy. So at one time I had a beautiful show at the Everson Museum, in New York, and, uh, the critics called it copies. So I said, this is ridiculous. If I continue this work, it'll become copy, which is true, you know, if people keep insisting on something eventually it becomes what they insist it is. So I pulled out. It totally sucked, and it was correct, it was right, it was right. And that's great because you aren't oftentimes right when you're thinking.

Any move I made into another medium was in order to articulate language, articulate visibilities, and stuff like that. That's because I was really compelling (sic) to do it.

Everyone today is curator, director, filmmaker, graphic artist--[we]ll, you know, it's so ridiculous, you can't be all those things and be great. You really can't.
  Video (reference) 280 words
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2013 self portrait See also.
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white
Transparent self-joined watch band 4.5 x .75 x .125 in
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2013 PROTECT ME FROM WHAT YOU WANT You, not/and I.Holzer
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Embroidered (cotton twill, fabric strap & buckle closure) cap, open edition.  OSFM
Available
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2013 Lacquer (Paulistano)  
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blue
Paulistano chair (leather, steel), navy lacquer 33 x 27.5 x 27.5 in
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2013 French Window (after Sturtevant, Duchamp)  
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green blue
Wood, enamel, metal, one-way mirror glass, perspex, corresponding aperture in wall


30.5 x 17.625 x 2 in
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2012-, 2013 ot_dna_morf_neewteb
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Animated gif dimensions variable
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2012 Tail End  
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black
Wall clocks Felix Gonzalez Torres clocks felix the cat 26 x 4+ x 2.5 in
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2012 Holzer Truisms
(日本語)
少しの知識でも大いに役に立つ 多くの専門家は変人である
男は母親になるということを分かり得ない
名前はそれだけで多くを語る
肯定的な態度は世界を変える
平然としている男がよりいい男であるということはない
タイミングを分かっているということは天才であることを示す
誠実な努力を求めているだけである
ひとつの出来事でも無限の解釈ができる
しっかりと根をはると自己意識を構築できる
強い義務感は束縛となる
完全に従順することは自由になるということでもある
抽象化することは衰微することであるとも言える
権力の乱用は驚くに値しない
行動は考えることよりも問題を引き起こす
疎外感は変わり者や革命家を生み出す
全てのものは繊細につながっている
野心は自己満足と同じぐらい危険である
心の矛盾は人生を台無しにする
結局は誰かがエリートになる
怒りや嫌悪も有用な動機付けとして使える
獣欲主義は至って普通である
どのような余剰も非道徳的である
どのようなものでも探求する価値がある
人為的な欲望は地球を略奪している
時として、行動を辞することの方が考えずに行動するよりも望ましい
時として無意識的なことの方が意識していることよりも正しい
自動化は致死的である
本当に悪い人々には過酷な罪が待っている
好ましくない動機からも良い結果が生まれることがある
ひとりで自分の時間を過ごすということは段々と好ましくないことになって来ている
何よりも幸せであることが重要である
ものごとに対して決め付けをするのは生きている証拠である
自分自身に確信を持っているということは、どこかぬけている
もう一度生まれ変われると信じていることは敗北を認めているのと同じである
倦怠感は気違いじみたことを思いつかせる
平静は不安よりも創造することとの相性がいい
恐怖を類別すると落ち着く
抑圧されてきたものが圧制者となったときには、変化に対し価値が認められる
新しいことを追い求めることは社会に害を与える
子供達は何よりも残酷たりうる
子供達は未来の希望だ
集団訴訟の思い立ちはよいが、そこに実質性はない
社会階層はプラスチックと同じぐらい不自然である
自分自身を困惑させておくことは正直でいるための一つの方法である
所有物に対する犯罪は比較的重要なことではない
衰退することはそれ自体が終わりを意味している
体裁とは相対的なものである
依存することでも生計は立てられる
叙述することは比喩よりも重要である
団体が結束するためには常軌をはずれるものを犠牲にする必要がある
ほとんどのものに対して嫌気が指すというのは妥当である
整理整頓ができないというのは、無感覚症の一種である
専門家に過度の信頼を置くことは好ましくない
感情的になりすぎることは、いつも本当に重要であることを不明瞭にする
起きている間に夢を見ることは物騒な矛盾である
一度死んでからものごとを見ると、より思慮のある視野を得ることが出来る
死ぬということは丸太から落ちるぐらい簡単であるべきである
貪食は罪である
事細かい説明はけがれの一形式である
感情的な応答は知的な応答と同様の価値がある
どうせ何も変えることはできないのであるから、いっそ自分自身を楽しむべきである
人生が滞らないようにする必要がある
自分の家族でさえも自分を裏切ることができる
何かを達成するには必ず犠牲が必要である
人々の仕事はどれも同等に重要である
興味深いものとは、全て新しいものである
特にすぐれた人には特権が値する
愛のために絶息することは美しいが、間抜けなことでもある
怒りを表現することは必要なことである
極端な行動は病的な精神からうまれる
自意識過剰は倒錯に陥る
忠実であることは社会的であるが生理的な決め事ではない
無関心さはそれが嘘であれ本当であれ、とても強い武器となる
父親はいつも力でものごとを動かしすぎである
恐れは全てを無力化する
自由とは必要なものではなく、贅沢なものである
感情に自身を委ねることは、正直な生き方である
情事にことを任せ、それがどこかに辿りつくままに身をまかせるべきだ
ものごとの流れに身をまかせるのは安易だが、危険もともなう
よい行いは必ず帰ってくる
行政は人々の重荷となっている
草の根的な扇動が唯一の希望である
罪悪感と自虐は耽溺である
ものごとを習慣的に軽視することは、研ぎ澄まされた感受性を意味しない
自分の感情を隠すということは卑しむべきことである
ものごとを全てさらけ出さないことは、自分にとって極めて重要なことを温存できる
人間中心主義は時代遅れである
ユーモアは気晴らしである
ある年齢になると理想はありふれた目標にとって変わられる
もし政治に関心がないのであれば、自身の生活は模範的であるべきだ
もし自分の足跡を残せないのであれば諦めた方がよい
願望は多くあったほうが面白い人生を送れる
もし簡素に生きていくのであれば何も悩むことはない
敵を無視することがもっともよい戦い方である
病気は心の在り方次第である
混沌が地獄であるように、命令を強いることは男の使命である
時には続けていくよりも死んだほうがましである
相続は廃止されるべきだ
何が何でも続けることでどうにかなる
時間を止めようとすることは勇ましいことである
みんな自分自身の仕掛けた罠にかかる
子供を産まないことは世界に対する大いなる貢献である
有名人であるよりも、良い人でいたほうがいい
自分よりも劣っている人と付き合うよりも、独りでいたほうが良い
鈍感でいるよりも素朴でいたほうがよい
歴史を分析するよりも、今の事実を学んだほうがよい
活発で夢のある生活をすることは重要である
余ったお金は慈善行為にまわすべきである
あらゆることに対して汚れないことは重要なことである
自分の親が自分の親であるということは偶然である
絶対的なことをいくつも持つのはよくない
信頼のみをもってものごとを進めるのはよくない
自然と同調して生きることは極めて重要である
信じてさえいれば何事も実現する
緊急時に備えて何かを蓄えておくべきである
殺すということは免れないことではあるが、自慢することではない
自分を理解することは、他人を理解するすべとなる
たとえいくらかかろうとも知識は向上させなくてはならない
労働は生命を破壊する行動である
個人的な魅力に欠けることは重大な問題である
余暇というものは大いなる煙幕である
自分の体の言うことは聞くべきである
過去を振り返ることは老いと衰えの兆しである
動物を愛することは代替的行為である
期待を低くもつことは自分を守るよい方法である
手作業をすることは清々しく、健全でもある
男が一人の伴侶を持つことは自然ではありえない
控えめであることは精神を害する
お金は嗜好をつくる
偏執狂は成功の前提条件である
道徳は小さな人間の為のものである
ほとんどの人は自分自身の習慣を築くことができない
大抵は、他の人のことに対して口を出すべきではない
母親は多くの犠牲を払うべきではない
あなたが生まれる前にほとんどのことは決められていた
殺人には性的な側面がある
つくり話は現実をより明瞭にすることができる
雑音も耐えられなくなる時がある
良し悪しの均衡を揺るがすものは存在しない
時として、信条は人々よりも重要となる
自身に関してはあまり人に伝えるべきではない
多くの場合、無性であるように行動するべきである
古い友人は過去に留めておくほうがよい
愚鈍は否応のない挑戦だ
痛みにはとても肯定的な面もあり得る
極端な見解をもっていない人は退屈である
自分を重要だと思う人々は気が狂っている
気違いでない限り、人々はその行動に責任をもっている
自分自身の手を使って仕事をしない人は寄生的である
正気を失う人々は感受的すぎる
失うものを持たない人々は適切な振る舞いをしない
体育は二番目にいいものである
将来の計画を立てるのは逃避主義である
冒険をしないことは長期的に大きな損害となる
駆け引きは個人的な利益の為に使われる
実現しないのであれば可能性とは意味のないことである
私的所有が犯罪のおおもとである
快楽のために快楽を遂行すると自分の身を滅ぼすことになる
機会がある限り、何度も自分を限界まで押しやることが重要である
男の子も女の子も同じように育てるべきである
行きあたりばったり寝るのもセックスにまつわる通念を暴くのにはいい
破壊的な衝動を回避できるのは大人になったしるしである
社会から離脱した人はいつも弱者となる
富の再分配は義務である
相対性は人類にとっての恩恵にはなりえない
宗教はそれが解決するのと同じぐらい問題をもたらす
いつでも選択ができるということを気に止めておくべきだ
反復はもっとも効果的な学習方法である
決意することは私達の意識をやわらげることができる
革命は個々が変わることからはじまる
ロマンチックな愛は女性をうまく操るためにつくられた
型にはまることは過去との結びつきである
日常的な小さい不行跡は時折の不節制よりもたちが悪い
自分を良くないことの為に犠牲にするのは道徳的行為ではない
救済は買えるものではないし、また売れるものでもない
自意識は自分を不自由にする
自己満足はいいことよりも害をもたらすことの方が多い
自己中は一番基本的な動機である
私心のないことは最もたたえるべきことである
分離主義は新しいはじまりへの道である
性による相違はいつまでも存在する
罪は社会を統制する手段である
狂気にすべりだすことは、他と比較するためにはいいことである
いいかげんな考えは時間とともにひどくなる
孤独でいることは充実したことである
時として科学は必要以上に早く発展する
時としてものごとはひとりでに起こるようである
自己の向上に時間を割きすぎるのは利己的である
飢餓は自然の成り行きである
静止は夢のような状態である
不妊法は主権者の武器である
強い感情的愛着は、根本的な不安感から派生する
あまり頭のよくない人は子供を産まないほうがいい
適者生存は男性と動物に関して当てはまる
象徴は実際のものよりも意味がある
自分の立場を強く主張すると、反対の立場に関心を集めることとなる
おしゃべりは行動が出来ないことを隠す為によく用いられる
人の性に関してからかうことは醜い結果をもたらす
技術は私達を作りもすれば壊しもする
もっとも酷な失望は自分自身の期待に答えられなかったときに起こる
子供を産もうと思う願望は死への願望と同じである
家族というものは借り合う時間の内に存在する
革命への思いは青春の空想である
超越という思想は抑圧を隠すために使われる
個人の特有性というものは、もうよりどころにならない
もっとも深遠なものごとは表現し得ない
平凡なものは大事にするべきである
新しいということは古いものの言い換えでしかない
本当に純粋でいるには自分だけで生きていかなくてはいけない
自分の行動の集積が自分が何であるかを決定する
得難いものは変わらずに魅力的である
世界は見つけることの出来る法則によって動いている
今日の世界には不変の真実が少なすぎる
自分が感じるもの意外には何もない
骨を折ることに何もいいことはない
考え過ぎは問題を呼ぶばかりである
誰かを性的に脅すことはひどい行動である
小心であることはあまり気にする必要はない
意見は合わなくても人間的な相違は前提としていない
自分から進んで行うことは反動的である
拷問は野蛮である
命と命を交換することは公平である
本当の自由とはおそろしいものである
独特なものが一番価値を持つはずである
愛を疑わないことは、多大なる気前の良さを示している
力をもって力を止めようとするのはばかげている
暴力は容認されるべき上に、時としては必要ともされる
戦争は修祓である
私達の生活の質を保つには犠牲を払わなければならない
何か恐ろしいことが起こったとに人々は目を覚ます
起こらなければ良かったと望むことは効果的ではない
根気をもてばどんな真実でも発見することができる
言葉は不十分であることが多い
心配することは準備をすることにつながる
自分は自分が守る規則の犠牲者である
夢の中では自分は偽りがない
自分はものごとの意味を構成する責任をもっている
自分は過去であり、今であり、そして将来でもある
子孫に養ってもらい生きていくことが出来る
他人にその人ではない何かになってもらうことは期待できない
自分を騙しながら他の人は騙せない
自分自身を養うまではものごとのあり方は分かり得ない
稀世であるには他の人を傷つけなくてはなれない
ごく少ない数の人とは親密でなくてはいけない
権力を持つものには反対をしなくてはいけない
何かひとつ大いなる情熱をもたなくてはいけない
自分がどこで終わり、世界がどこからはじまるか知るべきである
自分と同じ性の人のみ理解ができる
自分は世界に対して借りがあるが、その逆ではない
出来る限り勉強するべきである
誰も気がつかないのであれば、行動する意味がない
前から続いている不安ほどひどいものはない

Jenny Holzer Truisms translated to Japanese, translation

 

 

 


Jenny Holzer's Truisms  
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YM
2012- 1000 Hours Staring (after Tom Friedman)  
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white
179.5kb jpg [of Friedman's 1000 Hours of Staring], web analytics software dimensions variable
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67.86.156.104
68.196.24.87
71.125.208.128
72.229.244.10
74.64.34.14
80.194.240.183
99.22.94.31
114.162.140.148
114.191.41.85
116.91.101.194
131.253.36.202
159.172.177.17
173.3.169.8
187.37.49.192
192.110.165.87
202.161.17.103
203.198.141.82
2012 sottsass-seating-near-enigma.jpg  Sottsass's Seating Near Enigma (1983) constructed from two .jpgs.
Photo by Ai Oe.  
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grey
Cardboard, chipboard, glue, paint (acrylic, enamel, lacquer, tempera)  27 x 18 x 27.5 in  
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2012 Ken Kagami interview


Translation by Yu Morishita.     2,942 words
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KK
2012 国歌 [National Anthem]  Sō, sō, sō [...] Sō ne.
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red
Screenprinted card, ??? copies 6 x 4 in
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2012 P.E. Ball After Kazuo Okazaki, not necessarily as a parenthetical. 
岡崎和郎に続く、挿入句的とは限らずに.
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white
Rubber playground ball, enamel, air 8 in diameter
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2012 Platonic Affairs (Set of Swatch) Watches repaired, set renamed. One keeps the hours, one keeps the minutes; for two.  
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black
Watch faces, bands, and clasps 9 x 1.375 in each; dimensions variable when worn
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2012 Sejima  
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white
Tube of SPF 100+ sunblock  3.3 fl. oz.
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2012 Telephone Peace On Yoko Ono.
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white
Scissors with white handles 4.75 x 2.25 in
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2012 pieA Piece of Sky On Yoko Ono, etc., etc., etc.
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blue
Pair of adhesive silicone nose pads and surround on backing paper, endless supply  1 x 1.25 in backing 
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2012 Move On Yoko Ono

Play



    3:44 loop. 
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2012 FG-T _elix _onzalez-_orres.  
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grey
100% Wool, machine knit 16s / 35c / 37w (Custom US Mens ~XS)
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2011- one[Formerly 1,821 Perfect Words]

To follow.



    1,821+ words
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2011-12 qA Quick Look at Friend Art in Japan, part 1 (link to follow); Title, URL set within a 1:2.4 aspect ratio div, overall dimensions and attributes variable.
2
3 Google Translate recording (English to Japanese), 2:28.
4


  Various Various
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2011 boxA Box of Something Else On Yoko Ono.
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silver
Engraved silver box (empty)  2 x 2 x 2in 
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2011 Time For someone in NYC.
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white
Eraser, ink ~1 x 2.5 x .5 in
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2011 Perfect Lovers (after Felix Gonzalez-Torres)  
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blue
Watch faces, watch bands 9 x 1.375 in each; dimensions variable when worn
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2011 - Perfect Lovers (after Tobias Wong after Felix Gonzalez-Torres)  
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white
Virtual clocks dimensions variable
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2011 c"Critical Reflections on the Ontological Illusion Rethinking the Relation between ___ & _______ 1 "

 

 

 



1
A heading from an excerpt of G. Rockhill's forthcoming book as used at a presentation/lecture for In the Wake of 2013 (IWAB2011 Tuning Section) : Radical History and the Politics of Art. New York: Columbia University Press, Series “New Directions in Critical Theory,” 2012. All else is fairly literal, straightforward. 

 

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blue

Pair of non-skid doormats (blue on navy blue carpet inlay), outsourced  2 x 3.3 ft 
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2011 On Katie Paterson's
All the Dead Stars
"A map of all the dead stars in the Universe." 
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white

Anondized aluminum sheet 2 x 3 m 
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2011 bl
at IWAB



On whether or not1 offers a strategy for the consumption of art (practice) through a reconsideration of the red dot, which, as an indicator for purchase, remains a validating symbol for art. A yellow dot or blue dot is placed on the title card of each art work within the Tuning Section (and hopefully beyond) to evidence engagement of the respective artist as a collaborator and participant, voluntary and not. These artists, whose pre-selection as Biennale contributors already reflects a formal manifestation of appraisal, are thus figured in a work (i.e., ) whose ends are not the assignment of meaning or judgment. Rather, signifies and visualizes how declarative determinations can confront the restrictions of meaning beyond the conventional context of value and worth.
-

-
white
Blue or yellow dot (sticker), 22 dots total on 22 Tuning Section artists' wall tags 5mm each
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Subtle Imperatives determines the manner in which the work, , will eventuate at IWAB2011 and specifies parameters for criticality. Permission is asked from the organizing body to extend On whether or not past the Tuning Section to the whole of the Biennale.

Digital documentation:

 

-c
Tuning Reader stages the possibility for work and criticism for and about an artist to occur simultaneous to,2 rather than supplementary to, the artist’s work. Using the statements submitted by each artist within the Tuning Section, each volume of the Reader defines key terms employed by the author in the written description of their work, and contains transcribed example sentences [and reference texts] to contextualize these terms. The Tuning Reader uses words, necessarily impersonalized and objectified, to motivate discussion on the accountability of production and criticism, confronting the allusive totality of the visual.


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blue
B/w digital on cyclus, colored covers, 27 books (2 yellow, 20 blue offset on blue, 5 reference volumes/white), 8 - 228 pg; Digital variant, tuningreader.info 5 x 7 in each
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1 “... judgments are given and contained in the immediate experience of art. They coincide with it; they are … arrived at … through … thought; ... judgments are also ... voluntary; you can … choose whether or not judgments are honestly reported ...“ John Baldessari on Clement Greenberg (taken out of context), from Baldessari’s Clement Greenberg, 1966-1968.
2
In, and beyond, the attitude of STURTEVANT(’s) JOHNS FLAG, STELLA FOR PICABIA, WARHOL FLOWERS, (by means of titling, Sturtevant literalizes and offsets established syntax assigned to practice generalized as common to her own, i.e. After Artist’s Name / (after Artist's Name)) 

For TR bibliography, see. Thank you Christopher Ho, Jose Ruiz, Rae, Yun Ju Kim (translation of The Real Man for Vol. 7, and Jimin Song.
     


 
2011 STURTEVANT ART BIENNALE 2011 (INTERVIEW) A transcript of (a video of) an interview with Elaine Sturtevant at the Venice Biennale 2011 from June 6th, 2011. Corrections welcome.



Sturtevant: The people ! .... What people?! (Laughs)

Oh, Oh, we(ll) that's gonna be weird, cuz then I'm talking out of nowhere.

(Silent laugh)

I worked so long, uh, trying to develop my conceptual ideas, that I'm very used to, to working within this framework. So, it was never about getting a gallery or gaining fame, or anything like that. And the work has just slowly developed, as conceptual thinking does. And then, uh, there were several people that really pushed the work: Paul Maenz, gave me one of my first shows in Germany and really pushed it forward, Thaddeus Ropac, a gallery in Paris, and then I had a very big show with Udo Kittelmann at MMK, enormous show, beautiful show, so that all attention was structured on tone and sound - and cross structures, it was beautiful.

And then of course my show at the Museum of Modern Art, so I think this combination, and also the -, I think the show at the, uh, when I did the twelve-hundred coal bags at the Whitney Biennial, I forget what year, so I think the combination and then also we're becoming, the outside world is becoming more and more aware of the uh cybernetics of the digital world and its imposition.

It's not what I think, it's what I know. And the, the power of the work comes through with is basic, uh, uh, uh, force and concern with cybernetics and our digital world and the higher power of simulacra. And this is (wuh)-once you can, once you can, uh, manage to do that visually you start articulating visibilities and that's uh, uhm, a possibility or that's a ... way of, uh, making words objects and making uh sound an object -- I'm running off here. Okay, that's that. (Laughs)

That I'm always trying to trigger thinking. So that comes through a -- for instance, we've had (absolutely?) tremendous upheavals -- our hierarchies are upside down, like information is now considered knowledge. Image is, has, higher power than object. So if you've come to understand or think about some of these things, then you, then your hold on life is, is very different, how you can deal with it. I mean, we're kind of all we, you know, basically, we're not gonna need clones cuz we'll all be clones. (Laughs)

I never thought I'm only using males. I used artists that I felt could function strongly as catalysts.

I wrote an essay called "The Reluctant Indifference of Marcel Duchamp." (Basically) I don't feel that Duchamp is viable anymore. It doesn't mean he's (---), he's still very important, but all his references are so far away from, uh, what's going on. I, No, I'm not fascinated with Duchamp at all.

There are two things, there-r highly subjective, and uh, you know if you, if you, uh Heidegger who is not --- my least favorite philosopher, says once you start talking about live experience, then it's the end, it's the end of creativity. But that's, more importantly, is that now, uhm, artists are talking about experience, giving you an experience. So of course that brings you further and further away from what is there. Yeah, yeah, they're talking about their experience and making experience for you, so it's like, you know, your whole brain becomes something other than a brain.

 

 

  Video (reference) 557 words
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2012 STURTEVANT DELEUZE ABÉCÉDAIRE, FIRST SERIES A transcript of the video STURTEVANT, Deleuze Abécédaire, First Series, at Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac - Sept. 11 2012 from September 22, 2012. Alternate video: STURTEVANT | Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac | Paris | 2012 |. Corrections welcome.



Sturtevant: I kept saying, you-know-w-I, was glad my first, first one (of) my letters wasn't A, because I'd say th-the world was full of assholes, and that's really not a good way to start an interv—to start a dialogue. (Candid laugh).

I'm always trying to make, uhm, visibilities, articulate visibilities so that, so that, you can make thought an object and make thought visible. Deleuze has (a) wonderful, remarkable ability to, uh, discourse endlessly. He used to give seminars over in, uh, Vincenne, I guess, and he'd be crowded with these students who were on top of him and the smoke would be all over the place. (Laugh). And he'd just talk and talk and talk. It's just incredible.

Because my work was always being slotted into the wrong slot, I decided that I had to start writing, so I started looking for people that would, people that would, uh, support the work in some way, and of course Foucault and Deleuze are perfect, you know. But Hans Obrist pointed out to me, which was very, very crucial, that I was doing repetition before Deleuze wrote his Difference and Repetition. Hey (paced, deliberate clap/cheer).

-- work is based on a lot of Nietzsche and a lot of Foucault and a lot of Deleuze, then going way back on Spinoza, and, and, uh, all those funny fellows. When I finish this momentum that I'm into now, the different shows, I'm going to sit back, and do an opera on Spinoza. Which will be very tranquil and very nice. It's going to be fabulous. Yes.

 

 

  Video (reference) 264 words
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2012 STURTEVANT['S PERSONAL WORK OF ART -] FRANCE 24 A transcript of a France 24 interview with Elaine Sturtevant from April 2nd, 2010. Corrections welcome.



F24 / Eve Jackson: Hello. Is it possible to make a very personal work of art by replicating others? If you see the work of the American conceptual artist, Sturtevant, you can only say “Yes”! Sturtevant has repeated works by stars in the art market like Warhol, Duchamp, and Stella often well before they became famous. Now an exhibition at Paris' Modern Art Museum features a selection of her most important works as well as some new ones. And I'm delighted to say Elaine Sturtevant joins us now. Thank you for joining us, welcome to France vingt quatre.

Sturtevant: Thank you, thank you.

EJ: Now, there are two parts of this exhibition, The Razzle Dazzle of Thinking, there's "Wild to Wild", and my favorite, "The House of Horrors"--talk us through the exhibition, for those who haven't had the chance to go and see it. What can they expect to see there?

S: What can they expect to see? (Laughs) You-you mean when they go from Wild to Wild to The House of Horror? Well, th-the, uh, two -- The Wild to Wild is more about, uh, image over image, which is what we're about now in our cybernetic world, and so, it has, uhm, it has more space in terms of triggering thinking and it brings you back to yourself, yu-, and, it had to be in exact opposition to the other exhibition. So, when I was devising the other part, I knew that it had to be very different. So, then, uh, House of Horrors seemed like a good idea. So, The House of Horrors really, uhm, it's just entertainment, but the nice thing is, that, uh, Wild to Wild had the ability to give it the force of opposition. So that brings it up to a higher level. [Well] it's, it's very nice. It's very good.

EJ: And I noticed when I was there, there's even parents with their kids to have a go on the ghost train.

S: Yeah.

EJ: Is that the kind of thing you wanted, or --

S: Oh, we knew, we knew, I mean, this (Laughs)-- This was not done without closed eyes. No, of course, we also, I anticipated people would be more attracted to The House of Horror than Wild to Wild: People don't really like to think or reflect. So, entertainment of course is super. Then that's also the cybernetic part of the exhibition. Yeah.

EJ: Now, you are an artist really like no other. I read one critic say, ah, you copy artwork but you're not a copyist, you're a renegade female artist, but you're not a feminist.

S: Hm-hm--that's right.

EJ: What do you see yourself as?

S: I see myself as a very strong woman, and, uh, yeah, with a lot of-ah, lot of force, and a lot of power, and, uh, total enchantment and [a] love of living, of being. Yes, that's how I see myself.

EJ: Now, a few decades ago, I won't go into how many, you decided to, uhm, start replicating, if that's what you call it, I'm not sure, other people's work.

S: Mm-hmm ...

EJ: Why and when did you decide to do that?

S: Well, that was quite some time ago, that was when, uhm, in the, in the uhm, early 60s(?) and at that time, everything was, uh, very surface. Like we had, uhm, the Abstract Expressionists were just(-st) burning out then, we had Pop Art, which was at the very top. So, both those movements are very, all about, surface. All right. So, ha-having been in-, sort of embedded in that, I mean, surrounded by it, it became clear that I had to, uhm, one would have to think about the under structure [of a]rt, so that's how I came into it.

EJ: And you were quite ahead of your time, because lots of the work that you replicated was done by quite unknown artists, who later went on to become sort of super stars, didn't they? How did you have such a good vision? Was it just a coincidence, or --

S: Oh it's never a coincidence (Laughs) . No, it never happens as a coincidence. It's, uh, I think it [wa]s about having distance, uhm, distance from the self. And so then you have the ability to see what's going on and what will go on.

EJ: So what are you trying to say with your, with your works? With your art?

S: Oh my god, you wanna come to a seminar? (Laughs)

EJ: In a minute-- sum it up in a minute.

S: In a minute... I'm talking about cybernetic's intrusion, which includes the, it's digital underling. Uh, I'm talking about the imposition that our cybernetic world is now imposing on us, and our life, and our being , and our food, and our way of ev-, in every way, and so then that also impinges on the art world and what you have as art today. [Forces smile]. Briefly.

EJ: Briefly.

S: (Laughs)

EJ: What do you think of work like Andy Warhol's, that people automatically recognize and they associate something with it. What do you think--is that sort of art good?

S: Well you have to, for this work to function, you have to know the artist, see, you'd have to know Warhol when you look at one of my ten foot Flowers, then you have to know Warhol, because otherwise it doesn't function. Otherwise, it'd just be Sturtevant doing a ten foot Flower.

EJ: OK, well, I'm sorry to say we're out of time, but thank you very much --

S: Thank you!

EJ: for coming in and speaking to us.

S: It's been a pleasure.

EJ: And, uhm, The Razzle Dazzle of Thinking, the exhibition at the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville in Paris is on until the 25th of April.

 

 

  Video (reference) 953 words
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2011 STURTEVANT OPENING-DAY ARTIST TALK AT THE WALKER ART CENTER A transcript of Elaine Sturtevant's Opening-Day Artist Talk at the Walker Art Center from April 25th, 2009. Corrections welcome.



Peter Eleey: Hello, um, good afternoon and welcome to the Walker. I-I'm Peter Eeley and I've organized the show The Quick and the Dead upstairs in Galleries four, five and six which includes Sturtevant's Beuys Fat Chair from 1979, which I hope you all will have a chance to see if you haven't already. Uh, just a brief word of introduction, we're very pleased to welcome Sturtevant here today from Paris, uh. Since 1964 a good twenty years before the American art world of the 1980s was consumed by strategies of appropriation, Sturtevant has used some of the most iconic artwork of her generation as a source and catalyst for exploring the concepts of origin and authenticity, including those by Warhol, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Frank Stella, Jasper Johns, Marcel Duchamp and of course Joseph Beuys. She performs her sources rather than borrowing them wholesale, and uses the same materials and uses the same materials and conceptual tools as the artwork she repeats, but her pieces are never copies, in fact, she defies the end game of reproduction and and simulation that has come to characterize contemporary society. The brutal truth of the work, she has said, is that it is not a copy. The push and shove of the work is the leap from image to concept. And today she'll discuss the philosophical base of this radical work. And as she describes to me the imposition of our cybernetic world, and the zip zap of our digital world, with it's dangerous, potent power --

Sturtevant: Very good.

PE: please join me in welcoming Sturtevant.

S: Very nice Peter, thank you. Is my mic working -- yes -- that was very nice.Uhm, so today I'm going to, I'm going to overload you a little bit, I think. I'm going to start out with two interviews, uh, one of which was made while I was at MIT and one of which was made for Frieze. And, I think that will give you a ground to start with, and, um, how many of you know my work?

S: Uh, okay, (be)cause it makes, it makes a difference you know, thank you. Uhm, so, after the interviews I'm going to read an essay called Modes of Thought, and uh, then we're going to have a slide show (laughs), which is totally medieval.

S: And, uh, which is called The Transgression of Our Visual Desire. And, uh, what I would like to point out is that this is, a uhm, this essay Modes of Thought is-was, was written quite some time ago. And also the interviews, the one from MIT was done in ah mm 2000, something like that. So although I think it's very good in terms of a base, i(t')s not really what my present concerns are about. But, uh, okay, so let's, uh, Peter's gonna be kind enough, uh, to read -- he's gonna pretend he's the interviewer and

PE: mutters ? into mic

S: I'm gonna pretend I'm the artist.

. . .

PE: I first came across your work in a catalog of your drawing show at the Bess Cutler gallery, New York City. It was extraordinary because it looked like the work was talking about simulacra, yet when I looked into it I realized that it dated from the 60s. That seemed extraordinary and extreme at the same time.

S: Well, basically what was around at that time was the last ember -- embers -- of Abstract Expressionist and the hard blow of Pop both given by surface of involvement and pushed my to thinking about the understructure of art. The silent power of art, long term thinking with philosophical grounding.

PE: What would that('ve) philosophy (ha)ve been?

S: Oh God. Hegel, Kant, Nietzsche, heavy, heavy Nietzsche,
even those funny guys Spinoza and Schopenhauer?

PE: What about Deleuze and Foucault, both are used to support your work?

S: That was later, much later. Such monumental minds (coughs), especially Foucault and then the wonderful playfulness of Deleuze.

PE: Well it must have been scary because you were exhibiting artists at the same time that they were exhibiting. It must have been scary for you and the artists, too. How was it perceived at the time?

S: A lot of negative, some positive, the negative was about the market, that sort of nonsense.

PE: Well it was good marketing.

S: Oh, yes it was making Warhols to sell. Warhols? Very stupid. The supposed positive was that I was making 'mega-pop.'
(coughs) Excuse me. (drinks water) Have this (ho) habit recently of coughing, so you'll have to put up with this maybe. Let's see if we can stop it. (cough drop) Now let's see if I can try to talk with something in my mouth.
Okay, let's see whu-where were we (mutters). What. Where

PE: You were making mega-pop.

S: Mega-pop, mega-pop (mutters points mutters)

PE: Right there

S: Oh. Superceedeing Warhol, that made it even worse. Deleuze of course -- Dealers, of course, were freaking out of their minds because the work was very powerful.

PE: I wonder if I'm missing a page...

S: Oh, I hope not. No, it goes on, I'm just taking a long pause here.

PE: Oh, okay.

S: On the top, on the top of seeing, the Stellas appeared as Stellas and the Johns looked like Johns. This was enormously threatening for them. It created many problems, but that's an understatement.

PE: When all that simulation theory came out in the 80s, did that effect your relationship to that work?

S: No, of course not, but it helped some people to gain access, a (dis?) hinge to my work.

PE: How do you relate to the work of Sherry Levine?

S: Well, she is definitely somewhere else. And different issues and concerns. The appropriationists were very crucial to the forward movement of my work. But this is old history and Sherry Levine is great.

PE: Your work is about parameters, the parameters of art practice, parameters of art making.

S: Uh, those perpetual questions of originality --- certainly now a myth --- and the dynamic relationship of origins to original and man's anguish with retrieving origins. But this is neither here nor there, for we are now locked into devastating and dangerous modes of being.

PE: When I show people your work, they always hint at a sort of madness in their response.

S: A kind of madness -- that's great -- I like that. Certainly thinking is a kind of madness.

PE: The art of repetition: how does that shift the relationship to the art object?

S: The object is transposed by this repetition and then pushes a reversal of thinking of kind of standing on your head you can reject but it sits in your head like a bad buzz. You see, it's not the object in itself, but rather what, what occurs. That radical leap from image to concept, repetition distancing the work from the source, and at the same time elaborating upon it changing both the past and the future in a very dynamic way.

PE: Have you ever made a piece of work which you might do this act of repetition but might not end up as being an art object?

S: Oh, but definitely, yes. Language is double.

PE: What about your recent videos?

S: Uhm, well --- you see how old this is because -- the show was a long time ago. The last show at Ropac, the Dillinger Running Series was an attempt to push articulation against visibilities. The Greening to -- Greening of America in the reversal sense, of course, is a seven-frame discourse on excess, imitation, transgression, and exhaustion. And currently I'm working on The Dark Threat of Absence, a film for my Paris show in June, that's talking about the vast, barren interior of men.

PE: What kind of visbilities are you talking about?

S: Mostly about the torturous elements of (shifting/stiffening?) mental structures, visibility as an interior structure as opposed to visible.

PE: And how are they embedded in our thinking?

S: Mm, exactly (? ?) -- I don't know why I said exactly(? laughs) -- impending modes of thinking that control, restrict, chew up liberty and freedom with a base of falsity that has created a burning desire to death, killing, and for (all) those who retain a soul, the silent, solar inversion of (satanic?) desire, a violent desire to die more than to live.

PE: Ultimately, quite a pessimistic outlook ...

ES
Mm, not at all. It is what it is

PE: Are there any redeeming factors within technological development?

S: Mm, absolutely, if we weren't so sloppy with it.

PE:How do you see progress from this point of view?

S: Mm, progress is a slippe(r)y word and now blatant in its attempts to deprive man of all substance: the vigor of life, the vitality of food, the function of labor, the action of words. It's endless.

PE: Your viewpoints must be fairly unpopular in America.

S: (laughs) I've been unpopular so long it hardly even phases me. Besides, popularity is rather lumpy concept, no?
But how I do long for man knowing his full power with dreams and hopes for self, others and the Other.

PE: Chirac seems to be surviving remarkably well even though he is a pretty shady character.

S: What is going on here? Bush, Regan, Nixon; they are all gangsters. And Bush not only cheats and lies, but along with Sharon, has set in motion volcanic proportions of hate and despair. A true raping of the mind.

PE: Tell me why you moved to Paris.

S: You trying to change the subject? New York City was absolutely without discourse, art was consumed with subjectivity, a few (?) like that, but I always went to Paris from time to time, a way not to get glued to your own focus. Then again, wanted to make the Keifer Planes for my Kunstformen show and shipping that heavy lead plane would be something else again.

PE: The 80s was a significant return to the old orders of the establishment, it was a reconstitution of the old Avant-Garde.

S: Really? Avante-Garde, definitely medieval.

PS Do you get more discourse on your work in Europe?

S: (Marginally?) (.... ?) but I think LA, I think New York City and LA are coming to grips. (laughs)

PE: Isn't that lack of confrontation an American mannerism where everything has to be affirmed?

ES
Ah, strongly, and that is bad news.

PE: Well to tie this up, what about these hierarchies you talk about?

S: Yes the wonderful power of cybernetics' inversion of image over object, finite over infinite, man is God, Self is disappearance, origin as image, truth as falsity -- there we go.

PE: And here we go.

. . .

S: Thank you, Peter. (...) Great.
Now we're going to ask someone whom I think you all know, Philip Verne, to come up here and do the Frieze interview. Phi-leep? Hello Philip.
Nice to have you here.

PV Nice to have you here.

S: Okay, so this was in Frieze magazine, it's very short, but I think it gives you another idea, okay.

PV So. What images keep you company in the space where you work?

S: The outside of the inside.

PV What was the first piece of art that really mattered to you?

S: I don’t think it was art.

PV Sorry. If you could live with any one piece of art what would it be?

S: Oh, Impossible.

PV What film has most influenced you?

S: Any film of Quentin Tarantino because he is a concrete example of the vast barren interior of man: a big-time cyber jerk.

PV What is your favorite title of an art work?

S: Oh, Can’t be bothered with this. Why put your head into this? I can’t get there from here.

PV What do you wish you knew?

S: Everything (almost).

PV What should change?

S: Uh, hate, violence; our hot desire for death.

PV What should stay the same?

S: Definitely not the 'same’.

PV What could you imagine doing if you didn’t do what you do?

S: Raising a lot more hell.

PV What music are you listening to?

S: Notorious BIG

PV What are you reading?

S: Hm. Michael Jackson Was My Lover

PV Mine, too.

S: This Michael Jackson Was My Lover was really astounding book, I have to tell you. It's a-uh, super reality of truth as falsity; and always in-between, Gilles Deleuze and Michel Foucault to prevent brain damage.

PV What do you like the look of?

S: John Waters, Udo Kittelman, L. Muzzey. We could include you Philip.
You don't look bad either.

PV Thank you, always loved you.
What is art for?

S: What's it (?), oh, Current art is, is uh: to dangerously re-load, to fill a hole, to conceal the loss of power. That's it. Thank you Philip.

. . .

S: What mic is doing that?

PE: I don't know, might be this one.

ES
Is it mine, no.

PE: (mutters) When Sturtevant's done talking, we'll open the floor for questions, but I just ask that people wait and speak into the mic, so that everyone can hear.

PE: walks off stage.

S: Okay, so this lecture is called Modes of Thought, uhm, we tried to uhm, yeah, that's Plato's Idea same Idea -- Why are we running this now? I have no idea. What we have to do is, I tied to put this on, um, on the, uh, Powerpoint and as I talk about different shows, uhm, then the images are supposed to come up, so you just have to wing it a little bit, okay? (clears throat)

Modes of Thought. Repetition. Repetition is displaced difference. Repetition is pushing the (?) of resemblance. Repetition is interior movement. Repetition is (?) representation.
The Fold. The fold of the interior without the exterior is a vast, barren, interior man. I'm talking about Foucault and Deleuze's Fold. Plato's Dual Action of Idea -- weh it doesn't look like Plato, does it -- Okay, so now this is running now on the show, so we'll just go through it, okay?

Plato's Dual Action of Idea is now the perpetual convolution of seeing. These are modes of thought that reflect the depth and width of the work, but perhaps do not give zip-zap, nor do flat, heavy questions concerning the work that result in murky waters, interfering information that pulls further away from understanding. But understanding is not the role of knowledge. Rather, knowledge is made for cutting. This is indeed my premise. There is a need for thinking, that great all-time high. There's a need for pure distance. Uh, the (plural/brutal?) truth is that this work is not copy, not only by intention in meaning, but also by interior structure.
To think copy in relation to the work is to render it impugnment. Today of course, everything is double, copy, re-do, re-done, reload. However, to go beyond the surface of art, to probe the understructure, the silent power of art, demands utilizing representation, duality, to drastically reverse content. Thus, when content no longer refers to the visible, there is the radical leap from image to concept.

From exterior to interior. With this, paradoxical and antagonistic method of resemblance, but not in itself resemblance, the source works are vigorously emptied, and they are able to fulfill their role as catalysts. The essential, insistent murmur of resemblance and that of identity are there, but transformed. The force, this force, as you use to push and impel thinking in gender polemics, to resist, to give visible action to dialectics, and open wide space for new thinking. Implicit in conceptual thinking is forward movement that develops further of initial thinking. And so the current work demands the action and sound of film, so I'm talking about when I first started to go into film, so, that's a great running dog. That's from a video called Infinite Exhaustion.

To backtrack. The early work was concerned with making visible the concealed, to move away from the surface of objects, to the understructure. Thus, the following shows contain the same dynamics but with different focus. The show Powerful Reversals, which was not anywhere near that, (pause) uhm, (long pause) so, okay,

I think we just, I think I just had to give this up here. Ah, the show Powerful Reversals presented objects that were used to demonstrate art's move from the interior to the exterior. This is art's crucial shift to subjectivity without transcendence. Sports is, is art. Ça Va Aller encompassed the changing parameters of art, a desperate move, not to divest itself by siezing any and all fields, an entrenchment that hides arts loss of power. This is to fill a hole. Interior/Exterior Visibilities was a photographic show that attempted to remove "seeing" by distancing the object, to void the power to see. This is to reveal. Recent video con -- Recent videos contain a dynamic difference with a displacement of concept over image. The image over image. It no longer lies on the surface but is the surface itself. A hard ball way to make thought visible, resemblance is no longer the ruling power, but (with) repetition placing its force in movement, light and spaces.

And so, the one just before that was the Dillinger Running Series, I don't know how many images we have on that. Uhm (clears throat), the Dillinger Running Series, an essential leap to video, that brought, full force, the conceptual idea that thought could be made visible by action. A step to the broader dimension of articulating visibilities. A work that contains extrinsic movement, imposing on intrinsic, (be)cause it was a video that moved around the gallery and it's me running, and so, well nevermind... Extrinsic movement imposing on intrinsic movement, immediacy bound to distance, exclusion fraught with inclusion -- here is space running. The diagonal line, the architectural light, the dark fold. This is the power of thought. The Dark Threat of Absence Fragmented & Sliced is a a floor installation of seven videos--why are we stuck on this? Are we stuck on this? This is Dillinger. Okay.

The Dark Threat of Absence Fragmented & Sliced that constructs an agitated imbalance that is stuck and glued by transgression. The tight play between screens shows and makes sound an object of language, non action with time image, and movement, thought. In turn, it is also a jolting thrust forward to dislocate sovereignizing, pervasive strangulation on our modes of thought?

Cybernetics Rigid Loop, with its suffocating boundaries of limitation, excess, transgression, exhaustion, has created potent shifting mental structures by the reversal of hierarchies. Image or object, finite over infinite, information is knowledge, our truth is falsity, space is object is our place. Such reversals are fraught with dangers, creating interior jet-speed frisson that gives higher power to hate, violence, killing, greed, stupidity, absence. This is our cyberfold of our digital, paternal return.

We're going to go now into the Transgression of Visual Desire, which uhm, let's see, what do we have to say about that? Oh, it's because the images are not very bright or very good because there's too much distance between, so, I guess you just have to tolerate that. Okay. Mm, kay. Original sin is not -- this is Transgression of our Visual Desire -- Original Sin is not, is not original, but it most certainly is original sex. Sex is with Duchamp, is no longer viable. Sex no longer creates pleasure, sex is no longer crucial for creation. It's higher power rests in violence, killing, death, and into the vast barren interior of man. An absolute death of infinite absence that is a frisson gone bad. The falsity of sex jumps and jitters as in things. Art, of course, can be sexy -- uh, let's see I think I have something there (pause), this is a frisson gone bad.

Art of course can be sexy, the penis is a toy, ketchup is sex, ketchup noise is sex, white teeth are sex, shipping carts are concealed, controlled sex, painting is sex, big is definitive sex, a million watchers is a wet dream come true, money is sex, music is raw sex, sports are sex, Mickey Mouse is funny sex, interior visibilities are sex, insolence is nasty sex, sucked out content is sex, psyche replacement is dangerous sex, damage to the soul is sex, demise of the binary system is sex. Body parts are always a big winner. Even if in ads, green lips, or big breasts.

Truth most certainly is not sex.

But then again, falsity is hasty sex. Around or beyond things are the shabby inversions of satanic denial. Pulsating to, pulsating desire. Sex without mess, sex rampant with greed, fear, rave, rage, hate, pain, (laughs) stupidity. Sex is content, killing is content, death is content, food is content. This then is our visual desire of transgression.

So, I would just like to add -- That's it, basically. I would like to add, that, uhm, this really doesn't represent my current concerns. Um, Um, I'm very much now into the higher power of simulacra, and its disaster invasion, and it's, uh, terrifying power. But, I'm not gonna talk about that because that's a whole (n)other lecture. But this is what we should really be concerned about today.

So, we're going to open it up to questions, I hope there are questions ... (laughs) Okay.

. . .

Ah(l)et's see, I always try to think of a question to give people courage. One time someone asked a question and I gave the woman such a hard answer that it was (laughing) everyone was terrified to ask another question, so we don't want to do that. Let's see ... There must be some questions, huh. We have a question here from somebody down in the front row. (laughs)

Q When you say that you're talking about, um, your current interests focusing on the dangers of simulation -- simulacra

ES
simulacra

Q are you talking about, are you thinking about, um, things that our government is doing, are you thinking about war, are you thinking about entertainment

S: No.

Q no

S: No, no, none of those things Peter

Q Can you elaborate and clarify?

S: (laughs) Could I clarify, probably NOT.

Q No, no, that's the wrong question, nevermind.

S: No, when I'm talking about simulacra, I'm talking about it's how it's impositions on the art world and how, for instance, I I'm currently writing an essay and I'm trying to write it without using the artist's name and it's a bit difficult. But, um, there is, um, there is a current artist who is very much totally into selling who does really beautiful work but if you spend any time looking at it, it's very hollow. And instead of being different, the same is difference, it's same as same. So really it comes down to, it really sucks itself right into simulacra and simulacra of course is really just, I really think that we -- how can I say this -- I really think that if there are not some really good reversals in the way we think, if we do not pull ourselves away from cybernetics which I really don't think is possible, this, this, simulacra will become the most, the most important thing that we're involved with. And that relates back to (clears throat) how many is empty, and hollow. Yeah. If you don't use -- do any of you, do any of you read Foucault or Deleuze?

I hear a big roaring YES. (laughs)

Foucault and Deleuze are very interesting and Foucault particularly because he is a big challenge, and, um, they talk about the fold, so, uh, you have an interior and you have an exterior. And the exterior has to come to the interior and the interior to the exterior, but where we are now, everything is exter, exterior, so you have no, you have no references, you have no parameters, you have only the outside as your structure. That's not good.

That clarify things?

Q Is it just because it's false?

S: No, simulacra is not false. Oh no, no, this is why it's in higher power now, it is definitely not false. Simulacra is a very big number. And it's definitely not false. Yeah m. So it's changed, it's because it used to be considered false. But it's changed. It's no longer about model or anything like that. And it definitely is really, yeah, Okay.

Q What is it, replacing something that we need (... ?)

S: Well, you know someone said to me one time, "What do you want us to think?" and I said I don't want you to think anything, okay? I don't want to tell you what to think. I think it's basically what it comes to is there has to be some kind of ability to think, to reflect, to, to realize what to object, to be rebellious, and I don't mean walking down the street. But not to be trapped in some of this um horrible structures that really you know they suffocate you. Um, I just recently, I used to read, um, I used to read trashy books at he end of the day so I could go to sleep and (uh) now trashy books are not good, they're not good, and novels, if you read any current, most of the current novels, they're not, there's no character definition, there's narrative, but that's about it. They really have no substance, they have no essence. And, um, so no, I can't really tell you what to do. But I think thinking would help. Yeah. Thinking would help. And thinking doesn't mean that you decide to go to the supermarket. (laughs)

Q
So when you're talking about the fold, is there, is the presence within the fold, that it's possible? And ...

S: Well, it's not, it's not a tangible thing of course. It's like bringing everything of a, I don't, I really don't know -- it's not tangible. Uh, it's not something you can take hold of. Is that what you're asking me?

Q Um, well just about the darkness that you're referencing, the interior hole, I mean, the, is that where there's some, I don't know, almost like, a positive, something, because you know it almost seems like there's a, it seems like it's very negative, this constantly being on the exterior and all this simulacra, is that where there's the kinda it seems like, uh, the possible positive place with, is it was it is within the darkness or within the fold is what I'm ... wondering .

S: Yeah, well I'm using darkness as a uh, as um, a mode of thinking, not actual darkness. But as you know, that ability to reflect and to mediate, to think, so I'm not actually talking about darkness.

Q I guess that's what I was talking about. Is that where there's some sort of hope or whatever is in that maybe a place for reflection or within that darkness, I guess.

S: Uh, are you talking about hope?

Q Nu-I don't know.

S: I'm sorry.

Q I don't know. I don't know if that's the word.

S: What are you asking me, here?

Q I don't know. I guess I'm curious about that, that darkness seems that there is that kind of possibility for something that isn't there in the simulacra or in the exterior.

S: Or in the what?

Q In the exterior, or in the simulacra. It seems like there's, that's the emptiness that's within the darkness.

S: No, no, this is really ... We should be in a seminar now.

Q Sorry

S: No, that's really, um, no, that's not the way it goes at all, but I don't know how to start, I'm sorry. I really don't know how to start from A to Z to straighten that out a little bit. Um, let's see if I could think of something. I don't think so. You know, when you have, um, when you have something developed conceptually it's very complicated and very complex and so it's very difficult for me to start at the beginning and go forward. But, um, you could read, you could try reading Foucault, Deleuze, and they're very interesting to read and you just don't read it like, you know, read it first and don't try to understand anything and then read it again (pause)

Q Okay, sorry. I guess what's more thinking of Irigaray and

S: I can hardly hear you, are you talking?

Q I'm sorry I keep thinking of Irigaray and the, the, the the Lu-see EE-REE-GAH-RAI, the French, philosopher ...

S: Are you saying (revigorize/figurize?)?

Q Sorry, I guess I'll talk to you after (laughs)
I don't want to waste your time.

S: Yeah, talk to me after. That's a good ending.
Now it's very difficult to, um, to do that and, um, and I think probably my lecture I'm working on for next time goes into that more and clarifies that a bit. But, um, this is also like somebody with a transgression (of a) visual desire said to me: "How come everything isn't about sex? Why is that sex?" (laughs) and of course, it isn't about sex. It's about transgression, it's about desire, and it's about objects. So nothing is you know, head on, like that. You have to make leaps, da da da, and you have to have distance, you (mumbles/need) distance. Does that help you a little bit? Not at all.

Have any other questions?

Q Yeah I have a -- over here. Uh, I'm just gonna ask it. Do you have any physical practices to help you think, to facilitate thinking?

S: Do I have any difficulty what?

Q No, like, physical, things that you do with your body that help you when you're trying to wrestle with an idea or to stimulate your brain.

S: Yeah, I try to sit still (laughs).

Q I mean, really, that's it, you say, I'm going to sit still for an hour today. I just feel very overstimulated by the life that we have right now. Um, and sounds like you're dealing with that, so.

Q I deal with things very physically and I just wanted to know what you would do. Or what you do.

S: What I would do? When I'm doing what? (laughs)

Q It's just that you have

S: I'm not, I'm not sure I understand what you're trying to ask me. What I do when I'm doing

Q When you want to think. What do you do with your body ...

S: Oh, well, you don't, you don't sit down and say, "Okay, now I'm going to think"

Q Mm-hm.

S: It doesn't quite happen that way. No, no. It doesn't happen that way. It, um, if you have. Firstly, any, if the work is totally, and it is all conceptual thinking it develops so you have threads that go through the thinking. But you never sit down and think. You know, you never sit down and say "I'm thinking." If you're doing, if you're doing, um, let's say I'm doing a lecture and, um, so you have, so you have an idea of what you want to say or what you feel should be said and then if you start writing and that develops itself, and if you're talking about more, um, a more profound kind of thinking. That, that comes in long term, you know, that just isn't something you do like that. And so that's in some ways why you talk about light, horizontal light, and space and stuff because, um, when you get something that is, partic -- that really triggers something in your head, it's very, it's very -- gives you a big time high.

Q Can an exhibition like the Qui -- Can an Exhibition like The Quick and the Dead, the one we're here for, is that something that could be an antidote for the negative you see?

S: Um, yeah. Yes, definitely. I think the exhibition is extraordinarily beautiful, I think the museum, this museum is beautiful and people here in Minneapolis are very lucky to have this Museum. Um, I, I think that, um, not only (?) particularly impressive because the museum difficult as a space, extremely difficult as a space, so to install a show is very tricky business. And, uh, it's beautifully installed, it has threads, it brings you through different things, your head goes different places, yeah, definitely.
Anybody else?

Q Hi.

S: Hi.

Q Uh, thinking about the show and your work in the show, I was hoping you wouldn't mind commenting on the Beuys Fat Chair. I was noticing that it had a range of years next to it in terms of the date of the work and I was wondering if that meant the process of making it or thinking about it took a while, or -- And also, you and Peter, how did you guys come to think of that specific work for the show?

S: What was the last question, how did I what?

Q How you and Peter. the curator, came to think about that work for the show.

ES Well, you know that piece was gone -- done -- a long, long time ago, so it's -- it would be difficult to go back and think what the, to identify the thinking process on that. (coughs) Part, part of the installation in which it's a room with a light bulb give the piece a separation and it gives the piece a lot of power as opposed to where it's just sitting. And, uh, do most of you know Beuys's work? Probably, huh. Well in Darmstadt where they have that Fat Chair it's in a glass case, and it's probably a good idea because this is organic material, but, um, so, I think of that piece basically as kind of pulling you back and maybe triggering something. Yeah. Maybe it triggers (fat) hamburgers, I don't know. No, I'm kidding. No, so that there would be a kind of distance, and there would be kind of a, um, um, yeah, distance is a good word. So that it triggers something in your thinking. Okay.

Q Thank you.

S: I have so many people in this audience, you must have more questions. Come on.

Q Do you create to learn what you're thinking?

S: Pardon me?

Q Do you create to learn what you're thinking -- is that part of your process? Because I think a lot of people in this room are having a difficult time articulating the different ideas and creating those maps like you said, in creating those threads. Is part of why you create so that you can learn what you're thinking?

S: Why do I create?! Is that what you're asking me?

Q No I'm asking if you DO it as, as a way of learning and understanding what you're thinking. Or do you create with the direct intent to make external what has gone on previously?

S: Um, no each piece, each piece is done, is, is -- af, after I moved to videos it became very different. But when I was into painting and sculpture, each piece was predominantly trying get people to the silent power of art, the understructure of art. And, um, in terms of, um, video I, um, basically I think the work just has to be considered that hopefully it would build up some kind of, um, thinking, but trigger thinking. Which means, but you know, in, within yourself. For instance, I don't think, um, no, I'm not gonna say that. I think that's basically. I feel that I'm not being very articulate either. So I don't know how I can hep you here. Uh.

Q My question is a little specific and maybe it can provide some thread here. Uh, returning to your mention of Deleuze and Foucault, if one was going to approach a work or two of those thinkers, read in relation to your practice, which of those two would you recommend as a specific pathway?

S: Oh, it's really, it's really not, um, yeah, I wouldn't, I would recommend both. (laughs) Yeah, because, you see, the interesting thing about Deleuze is that he really plays, you know? And so sometimes he plays and it gets really mucked up and it's not very interesting. Fou-Foucault is very, like, he always pulls your head somewhere else. And he not only pulls your head somewhere else, he really does trigger thinking because of the way he writes and the structure he uses for his writing. But then, you know, I came out of, I really did come out of Kant and Hegel and Nietzsche, and so that gives me a very firm structure to work with, which is very different. But I think if you wanted to read them, you know, I really do go back to them all the time, when I'm feeling a little brain dead I go back to Foucault and read him and (mumbles). You, which I think I mentioned, you should, you don't read them to understand them immediately you just read them. And then as you re-read them you start beginning to -- to

Q Well, where would you recommend people to start with the process, which specific texts

S: Pardon me?

Q Which specific texts would you be a great, a good, place to start with that process?

S: Oh, well, oh, I think the, the easiest, which won't be easy, it would be the interviews, Foucault interviews, of which there are several volumes. That would be the easiest to start with because he's more, he's more, into, um, he's more into explaining, okay, or trying to clarify the thinking. So I think taht would be the easiest and the best, yeah. And they're all translated in English, so.

Q I have a question about the different, but related, um, systems of music and art, particularly in art reproduction, often times it's about claiming a territory. In music, reproduction's become normalized as performance, and I'm curious in your early works if there had been an earlier relationship between you an music performing or thinking about music as a text that can be played in which you inhabit the the work, but don't necessarily possess the work. Whereas, well, just go with that.

ES
Well, I must say that I am very much into music, you know, I listen to music a lot, but no, it would not be related to, to, directly to the work -- at all. But, um, but then that would be maybe like having a ground of Nietzsche and so forth and so on if you have a very big ground in music then that probably adds something to your dimension, you know, yeah.

Q Are you finding in Paris, uh, there are a group of artists that uh you have an opportunity to meet with and a related question are there any artists in the current exhibit that you have conversed with.

S: Oh, well, uh, the last, I would not answer. In Paris, uh, now I don't really, uh, I don't hang out with artists. So, um, but there are, you know, Parisians are highly intellectual, I mean, the way, I wish I had been brought up in French education. So basically I spend my time with, um, people who are critics or curators or people like that, you know, that are into talking a lot about heavy numbers. Yeah, no, I don't really hang out with artists. No. That answer your question?

Q I lost the mic.

S: You lost the mic.

Q Thank you.

S: Okay, is that it? One more? Okay.

Q Hi, I remember reading an interview, a Warhol interview, where he was being asked about his work, and, um, the question was, can you explain the work, and, um, Warhol said, "I don't know, why don't you ask Elaine?" And I was curious, if you could just comment briefly on your relationship with Andy or, um, just fill us in a little bit on that.

S: I really didn't know Andy very well. I saw Andy. But then I think, I think at some one interview I think I said, "Once you know Andy, there isn't mush more to know." So, but he was, um, uh, Andy was just an absolutely wonderful person and, um, he was also extremely shy, which you know didn't didn't, well, I guess it was pretty obvious too. Um, yes it did, we were standing outside the gallery and this young student was pestering Andy about his process and he says, "Ask Sturtevant," you know. So, but also I tell you, you know, he had a wonderful sense of humor in many ways so one time he, he had a show at Gagosian in New York this was years ago and it was his piss paintings on bronze. So we were standing outside the gallery in New York and he said, "So Elaine, why don't you do one of my, my piss paintings?" And I said, "Andy, I don't have the right equipment." And he said, "Well, uh, Bianca did one." And I said, "Shit, I didn't know she had a prick."
So, everybody laughed, but Andy was deep red. He was so, he was so embarrassed, you know. Yeah, yeah, but I didn't really see him that much, I saw him a few times at the Factory. I saw him mostly when I, I never really sat down, I had him a few times at the house for dinner and, um, but I saw him mostly at parties and big dinners and stuff like that. But he, he was a great guy. He really was. Yeah, we, we're very lucky to have Joe Wax here today, who is head of the Warhol Foundation in New York City. Uh, yeah. So he could probably answer any questions about Warhol.
Yeah. Mm, kay. Is that it?

Okay, thank you very much for coming, huh.

Thank you.


  Video (reference) 6885 words
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2011 - Trustisms On not knowing how to consume the work of Jenny Holzer, but having always wanted to trust in it nonetheless. Lists of phrases are selections as trusted by each author, from Holzer's Truisms.

 


Participate / 参加するには、ここをクリックして下さい

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Jenny Holzer's Trusisms, Risograph print on colored paper

8.5 x 11 in each sheet
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[For Works of Art on Paper, TMMA, 2012:] Risograph print on paper, endless copies (for the duration of the exhibition) 11.375 (ideal height) x 8.25 x 11.375 in
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2011 self portrait  
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bag (white), endless edition
dimensions variable
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2011 Double Portrait As a pair or not; a commentary on meaning and translation. Stacks of Gonzalez-Torres/Kwon/Storr/Ault's and Gonzalez-Torres/Spector's Felix Gonzalez-Torres, respectively, collated as if the books complete with covers and end page blanks.

Image by A. Russeth.
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Double sided print on paper, endless copies height varies x 39.375 x 27.5 in
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2011 Hints & Incidentals Tourist Objects, part 2.
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See mirror. Various
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2011 Gestures mask (engaging two): S, M, L
Godard still (requiring two): S/M, S/L
your tender/tender/tender (requiring two): S/M, S/L, M/L
tenuousness (to speak of two): S, M, L

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Industry standard work gloves, thread dimensions variable
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2011 Ideal Weight A portrait of Felix Gonzalez-Torres; wrapped-as-a-pair candies bagged or piled to the average weight of two hearts.  
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Cellophane wrapped candies, ideal weight 500-700 grams (22-24 ounces)  9 x 12in cellophane bag, dimensions variable
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2011 INFJ, Ltd.  
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Engraved acrylic sign in holder

 
2.5 x 8 x 2 in 
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2011 Onsen Matches a particular winter/spring skin tone when drowned.
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Elastic hair tie, (93% silk 7% elastane) sheer suit with tonal topstitching Custom US ~XS
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2011 Excuses L: embossed WENT TO GO SEE ABOUT TOBIAS WONG
R: embossed TOBIAS WONG NI AI NI NI NI ITTA 
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Post-it notes 3 x 3 in, dimensions vary with installation 
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2010 Bad News Rope that unravels for the weight of a person. R.I.P. Tobias Wong.
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Joined and braided and woven aluminum, silk, and pure silver tinsel-type lengths 17.4 ft length
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2008 Architectures of Nonchalance, Descriptions to follow.

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Pencil on paper 24 x 36 in each
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2008 Interruptions for five Philippine churches (a driving aside) Churches in the Philippines were located and programs associated with the patron saint of the church were used to image a use-value for the buildings apart from their ritual function. Programs specified were meant to index the progress of (5) fellow section-mates.

top, l-r: Church surrounding existing bridge near Rizal (specified to Saint Peter, patron of bridge builders; access to the church is through the existing trolley that traverses the bridge, the church rises with floodwaters) / Library hung within Santo Jerome (the patron of scholars) in Morong
bottom, l-r: Preschool in the towers of and perched within the back interior façade of Santo Nicolas (the patron saint of young children) in Mati; Observatory in the west tower of Santo Domingo (the patron saint of astronomers) in Metro Manila; Well with Chapel at the foot beneath the Miagao Cemetery capilla in Iloilo

 

In the Philippines, the serialized monument of the Catholic Church dominates the built landscape, and continues to serve as an agent of cultural repression. However, the church has provided the ground for a third way (outside of assimilation or disappearance) to enter the alibi of Filipino cultural identity. This third way consists in transforming the secular economy which places them in solidarity with their colonized past. Their specificity/culture is still defined by the colonized, by a given, by a system of representations and as an object of exploitation, but has found its affirmation in a set of rituals and revisions deployed within the situation created by capitalist imperialism.

The most apparent view of the church in the Philippines is one which seeks to equalize the colonizer and the affected body – the relation is reflective, falsely erasing the difference between subject and object. As a perpetual outsider to my own culture, I believe that architecture is an intermediary, similar to the role of saints for whom the churches are named. The given view of the church can be re-placed and reanimated, functioning in order to maintain a separateness.

 

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Pencil on paper (3) 18 x 24 in; (2) 3 x 15 in
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2007 Chocolate Factory L: Main complex; R: Program scattered throughout the site. Competition submission.
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Pencil on paper 18 x 24 in each sheet    
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Repeats ...